Information for Cavers

The caving community has a strong conservation ethic and has provided long-time support of bat conservation. We request that cavers observe all cave closures and advisories and refrain from caving in WNS-affected states and adjoining states at any time. We also recommend refraining from caving anywhere during bat hibernation to minimize disturbance to bats.

 

Updated white-nose syndrome map November 16, 2015

Reflects bats collected back in March confirmed with white-nose syndrome in four counties in Tennessee: Coffee, Giles, Marshall, and Robertson.

Fungus that causes bat disease detected in Nebraska

November 12, 2015
Contact: Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, Mike Fritz 402-471-5419
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Catherine Hibbard 413-253-8569

LINCOLN – The fungus known to cause white-nose syndrome (WNS) in hibernating bats, a disease that has decimated bat populations in the United States and Canada, was recently discovered for the first time in Nebraska.

Updated white-nose syndrome map October 5, 2015

Reflects a little brown bat collected in May 2015 near the city of Gaspé, adjacent to Forillon National Park in the region of Gaspésie, testing positive for white-nose syndrome. This represents the farthest east case of WNS in Québec and it is the first county positive in the Gaspésie region.

Declines and Slow Recovery in Little Brown Bat Populations Predicted: Highlights Severity of White-Nose Syndrome and Critical Research Needs

September 28, 2015

Contact Information: U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey Office of Communications and Publishing,12201 Sunrise Valley Dr, MS 119 Reston, VA 20192, Marisa Lubeck Phone: 303-202-4765, Gail Moede Rogall Phone: 608-270-2438

Populations of bats diminished by white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease of hibernating bats, are unlikely to return to healthy levels in the near future, according to new U.S. Geological Survey research.

Updated white-nose syndrome map May 19, 2015

Reflects spread of the fungus and white-nose syndrome in eastern Oklahoma's Delaware County. With these new findings, Oklahoma becomes the third state where the fungus has been confirmed, but the disease is not yet present.

Updated white-nose syndrome map May 1, 2015

Reflects spread of the fungus and white-nose syndrome in two new areas in western Ontario, Canada: confirmed near Atikokan and "suspect" near Beardmore. The Atikokan site is the furthest west site confirmed for white-nose syndrome in Canada.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Protects Northern Long-eared Bat as Threatened Under Endangered Species Act

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Protects Northern Long-eared Bat as Threatened Under Endangered Species Act Also Issues Interim Special Rule that Tailors Protections to Eliminate Unnecessary Restrictions and Provide Regulatory Flexibility for Landowners
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today it is protecting the northern long-eared bat as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), primarily due to the threat posed by white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease that has devastated many bat populations.

How Does White-Nose Syndrome Kill Bats? New Science Helps Explain Hibernation Disease

For the first time, scientists have developed a detailed explanation of how white-nose syndrome (WNS) is killing millions of bats in North America, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Wisconsin. The scientists created a model for how the disease progresses from initial infection to death in bats during hibernation.

What is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommending in its cave advisory?

What is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommending in its cave advisory?

The Service’s cave advisory has recommendations to limit the possible spread of white-nose syndrome by human activity:

  1. A voluntary moratorium on caving in states with confirmed WNS and all adjoining states; Nationally, in states not WNS-affected or adjoining states, use clothing and gear that has never been in caves in WNS-affected or adjoining states; State and federal conservation agencies should evaluate scientific activities for their potential to spread WNS; and Nationally, researchers should use clothing and gear that has never been in caves in a WNS-affected or adjoining state.
  2. This also applies to mines used by cavers.