WNS Information Resources

Reflects the first update based on 2015/2016 surveillance: the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome found in Christian County, Missouri.
Updated white-nose syndrome map January 26, 2016
Reflects a bat collected in Boone County, Arkansas collected in 2015 testing positive for the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome.
Updated WNS map January 12, 2016
We're entering an exciting new era in the fight against white-nose syndrome. This fact sheet summarizes how we got here and where we expect to go next in for testing promising treatments in the field.
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Reflects bats collected back in March confirmed with white-nose syndrome in four counties in Tennessee: Coffee, Giles, Marshall, and Robertson.
Updated white-nose syndrome map November 16, 2015
Reflects the detection of the fungus causing white-nose syndrome in Cass County, Nebraska.
Updated white-nose syndrome map November 10, 2015
Reflects a little brown bat collected in May 2015 near the city of Gaspé, adjacent to Forillon National Park in the region of Gaspésie, testing positive for white-nose syndrome. This represents the farthest east case of WNS in Québec and it is the first county positive in the Gaspésie region.
Updated white-nose syndrome map October 5, 2015
Reflects swab taken in March testing positive from a mine shaft in Stanly County, North Carolina. This represents a new county and region of North Carolina afected. All other Pd/WNS-positive counties are in the mountains and this record is from the Piedmont region.
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The purpose of this document is to provide consistent Acceptable Management Practices (AMPs) for nuisance wildlife control operators (NWCOs) to reduce impacts on bats during bat control or removal activities in structures.
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White-nose syndrome fact sheet updated November 2015.
screen shot of fact sheet
Reflects the detection of P.d.(fungus that causes white-nose syndrome) in Oachita and Ozark mountains and confirmation of white-nose syndrome in Garland and Polk counties in Arkansas.
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Reflects spread of the fungus and white-nose syndrome in eastern Oklahoma's Delaware County. With these new findings, Oklahoma becomes the third state where the fungus has been confirmed, but the disease is not yet present.

Updated white-nose syndrome map May 19, 2015
Reflects spread of the fungus and white-nose syndrome in two new areas in western Ontario, Canada: confirmed near Atikokan and "suspect" near Beardmore. The Atikokan site is the furthest west site confirmed for white-nose syndrome in Canada.
Updated white-nose syndrome map May 1, 2015
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Reflects white-nose syndrome confirmed in Delta County, Michigan.
Updated white-nose syndrome map April 29, 2015
Reflects first-time confirmation of white-nose syndrome in Iowa: Des Moines and Van Buren Counties and in Missouri Clay, Ralls, Moniteau, Ozark, St. Francois, Callaway, Cooper, and Miller counties all "suspect" for the disease.
Updated white-nose syndrome map April 17, 2015
Reflects Floyd County in Georgia as white-nose syndrome "suspect" due to obvious signs of the disease seen on bats and positive swabs taken from bats in a cave that tested negative in past years.
Updated white-nose syndrome map April 9, 2015
Reflects white-nose syndrome confirmed in Manistee County, Michigan as well as “suspect” in Marquette County, Michigan. Also, reflects white-nose syndrome “suspect” site identified in Ontario. This site is currently the furthest west the pathogen has been found in Canada.
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USFWS funds for WNS research and state capacity
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Agenda from 2013 WNS Workshop in Boise, Idaho
Reflects white-nose syndrome confirmed in Illinois in Union, Saline, Johnson, and Jackson Counties.
Updated white-nose syndrome map March 12, 2015
Reflects new counties in Arkansas: Independence and Newton County confirmed for the disease and Madison County is suspect due to swabs from bats and cave walls testing positive for the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome (Pseudogymnoascus destructans).
Updated white-nose syndrome map March 9, 2015
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Updated map reflects white-nose syndrome confirmed in Barren County, Kentucky and Alger and Houghton counties in Michigan. Also, Clare County, Michigan "suspect" for the disease.
Reflects little brown bat seen with obvious symptoms of the disease in Barren County, Kentucky.
Updated White-Nose Syndrome Map February 13, 2015
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Reflects swab sample results from two tricolored bats in Dane County, Wisconsin, which showed presence of Pseudogymonascus destructans, the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome. No bats displayed any visual signs of the fungus.
WNS map updated January 23, 2015
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Revised case definitions for classifying white-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats. These case definitions were developed in conjunction with laboratory representatives from the WNS National Plan Diagnostic Working Group and standardize the interpretation of laboratory test results.
Reflects white-nose syndrome confirmed in Richmond County, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Updated WNS map September 3, 2014
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This is a draft of the Captive Bat Management report produced by a committee of the WNS Conservation and Recovery Working Group. This draft is for review purposes only.
Reflects western-most confirmation of white-nose syndrome in Canada: in Thunder Bay District, Ontario, near Lake Superior.
Updated WNS map August 25, 2014
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White-nose syndrome fact sheet updated August 2014
August 2014 White-nose syndrome fact sheet
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Reflects white-nose syndrome confirmed in Clay, Macon and Grainger Counties, Tennessee.
Updated WNS map August 18, 2014
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Reflects detection of the fungus causing white-nose syndrome, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, in Carter and Greene Counties, Missouri.
Updated WNS map August 7, 2014
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