Midwest Bat Working Group

Northeastern, Southeastern, and Western bat working groups had been formed earlier to bring bat biologists and conservationists together to discuss mutual problems, collaborate on projects, and otherwise to move bat biology and conservation forward. However, there was no Midwestern Bat Working Group, although a start in this direction had been made earlier by Joe Kath, Rob Mies, and others in 1998. This group, called the Northeastern Bat Working Group, included 22 northeastern and midwestern states. Three annual meetings were held from 1998- 2001. One included an Anabat II Workshop in Ohio. The third in 2001 was held in Kentucky and was co-sponsored by the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network. This meeting included a symposium on the conservation and management of Myotis sodalis. Ultimately this group proved too large and momentum sagged. The current, smaller Northeast Bat Working Group evolved from it, leaving the Midwestern to form its own group. Finally, some progress was made.

Northeastern, Southeastern, and Western bat working groups had been formed earlier to bring bat biologists and conservationists together to discuss mutual problems, collaborate on projects, and otherwise to move bat biology and conservation forward. However, there was no Midwestern Bat Working Group, although a start in this direction had been made earlier by Joe Kath, Rob Mies, and others in 1998. This group, called the Northeastern Bat Working Group, included 22 northeastern and midwestern states. Three annual meetings were held from 1998- 2001. One included an Anabat II Workshop in Ohio. The third in 2001 was held in Kentucky and was co-sponsored by the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network. This meeting included a symposium on the conservation and management of Myotis sodalis. Ultimately this group proved too large and momentum sagged. The current, smaller Northeast Bat Working Group evolved from it, leaving the Midwestern to form its own group. Finally, some progress was made.

 
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