White-nose syndrome news

Fungus that kills bats prompts continued precautions at Arkansas caves

A low level of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats has been detected in two north Arkansas caves. The fungus was discovered in a cave at Devil’s Den State Park in Washington County and a private cave located in southern Baxter County. No bat deaths due to white-nose syndrome are known to have occurred in Arkansas.
 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Awards Grants to 28 States for Work on Deadly Bat Disease (June 2013)

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced grant awards totaling $950,694 to twenty-eight states for white-nose syndrome (WNS) projects. State natural resource agencies will use the funds to support research, monitor bat populations and detect and respond to white-nose syndrome, a disease that afflicts bats.
 

WNS detected in TVA cave in Alabama (News release, April 18, 2013)

The fast-spreading fungus that causes the deadly white-nose syndrome in bats has been found in Collier Cave in northwestern Alabama on property managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority.
 

Retired military bunkers used as artificial bat hibernacula at Aroostook National Wildlife Refuge in Maine (April 9, 2013)

In an effort to address mortality rates of little brown bats, biologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Maine Department of Inland Fisheries, Vermont Fish and Wildlife, New York Department of Environmental Conservation and Bucknell University have investigated the potential for using decommissioned military bunkers on national wildlife refuges as artificial hibernacula for imperiled bats. These sites could offer predator-free winter habitats for bats where biologists can monitor behavior and implement possible treatments against WNS. These sites may also be decontaminated during...
 

WNS Confirmed at Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge, Alabama

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has confirmed the presence of white-nose syndrome at Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge in Jackson County, Alabama. Fern Cave provides winter hibernation habitat for several bat species, and contains the largest documented wintering colony of federally listed endangered gray bats, with over one million gray bats hibernating there. The disease was confirmed in tri-colored bats that were collected at two entrances to the cave. Although no visible fungal growth was observed on hibernating gray bats during these winter surveys, lab testing detected the...
 

Deadly Bat Disease Confirmed in Georgia (March 12, 2013)

ATLANTA (March 12, 2013) – The disease that has killed millions of bats in the eastern U.S. has been confirmed for the first time in Georgia. The Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the National Park Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that bats with white-nose syndrome were found recently at two caves in Dade County.
 

Bat disease white-nose syndrome confirmed in South Carolina (March 11, 2013)

The S.C. Department of Natural Resources recently received confirmation that white-nose syndrome, a disease that has killed millions of bats in eastern North American, is now officially in South Carolina. Until now, South Carolina appeared to be insulated from white-nose syndrome (WNS). However, a dead bat discovered recently at Table Rock State Park in northern Pickens County has been confirmed to have WNS, which spreads mainly through bat-to-bat contact and has not been found to infect humans or other animals.
 

WNS confirmed in Prince Edward Island's bat population (February 27, 2013)

Diagnostic tests conducted by the Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre at the Atlantic Veterinary College confirm the presence of bat white-nose syndrome (WNS) in Prince Edward Island’s bat population.
 

WNS Confirmed in Illinois Bats (February 28, 2013)

Springfield, IL - The Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) today confirmed the presence of White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), a disease fatal to several bat species, in four Illinois counties.  The University of Illinois- Illinois Natural History Survey (INHS), the United States Forest Service (USFS)-Shawnee National Forest, the University of Illinois' Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (UIVDL), and the USGS National Wildlife Health Center-Madison, WI (NWHC) assisted in the discovery of WNS which was detected in LaSalle County in north-central Illinois, Monroe County in...