White-nose syndrome news

White-nose syndrome confirmed in Arkansas

Arkansas becomes 23rd state to confirm deadly disease in bats YELLVILLE – The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission has confirmed the presence of white-nose syndrome, a disease fatal to several bat species, in Arkansas. The disease was documented in two northern long-eared bats found at a cave on natural area managed by the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission in Marion County. White-nose syndrome is thought to be transmitted primarily from bat to bat or substrate to bat, but fungal spores may be inadvertently carried to caves by humans on clothing, boots and equipment. The syndrome is...
 

UA researchers trace bat killer’s path

As North American bats face a death toll approaching 7 million, University of Akron scientists reveal new clues about their killer, White Nose Syndrome, or WNS. The UA researchers reveal that the deadly WNS fungus can likely survive in caves with or without the presence of bats and threatens the regional extinction of North American bats.
 

USGS National Wildlife Health Center released updated Bat Submission Guidelines for WNS

From Wildlife Health Bulletin 2014-01 "The National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) has updated the Bat Submission Guidelines for the 2013/2014 WNS surveillance season. These guidelines, which are available on the NWHC WNS Web page, replace all previous NWHC bat submission criteria. Included are reference charts to assist submitters with selecting priority species and appropriate samples for diagnostic submission based on location (a map that designates WNS Management Areas as either within the endemic area, the intermediate area, or the at-risk area is included on page 10). These guidelines...
 

Updated Battle for Bats Video available!

Battle For Bats: Surviving White Nose Syndrome is an updated, 2013 version of the original, 2011 Battle for Bats video. This 14-minute film shows what government agencies are doing about white-nose syndrome and how you can help. Produced in partnership by the USDA Forest Service and National White-nose Syndrome Communications Working Group, the video may be embedded on your website.
 

The Enemy of my Enemy is my Friend Volume 31, No. 2 Summer 2013 BATS Magazine

A new hope in the battle against WNS? Article by Chris Cornelison in Bat Conservation International's BATS Magazine.
 

Vermont Bat Researcher Helps Injured Man Out of Cave

A fish and wildlife specialist for the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department, familiar with caving techniques through years of surveying bats, used his experience to help an injured man out of a Vermont cave last week. Bat researcher Joel Flewelling was among the first rescuers able to reach the stranded patient deep inside Weybridge Cave on Tuesday, August 6. The man had broken his ankle in a fall and was unable to get out of the cave. He sent his friend to get help.
 

Fungus dangerous to bats detected at two Minnesota state parks

A fungus dangerous to bats has been confirmed at Soudan Underground Mine State Park and Forestville/Mystery Cave State Park, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The fungus is known to cause white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that is harmful and mostly can be fatal to hibernating bats and has decimated bat populations in the eastern portions of the United States and Canada.
 

Forest Service Scientists Identify Key Fungal Species that Help Explain Mysteries of White-Nose Syndrome

MADISON, WI, July 25, 2013 - U.S. Forest Service researchers have identified what may be a key to unraveling some of the mysteries of White Nose Syndrome: the closest known non-disease causing relatives of the fungus that causes WNS. These fungi, many of them still without formal Latin names, live in bat hibernation sites and even directly on bats, but they do not cause the devastating disease that has killed millions of bats in the eastern United States. Researchers hope to use these fungi to understand why one fungus can be deadly to bats while its close relatives are benign.
 

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