White-nose syndrome news

The Enemy of my Enemy is my Friend Volume 31, No. 2 Summer 2013 BATS Magazine

A new hope in the battle against WNS? Article by Chris Cornelison in Bat Conservation International's BATS Magazine.
 

Vermont Bat Researcher Helps Injured Man Out of Cave

A fish and wildlife specialist for the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department, familiar with caving techniques through years of surveying bats, used his experience to help an injured man out of a Vermont cave last week. Bat researcher Joel Flewelling was among the first rescuers able to reach the stranded patient deep inside Weybridge Cave on Tuesday, August 6. The man had broken his ankle in a fall and was unable to get out of the cave. He sent his friend to get help.
 

Fungus dangerous to bats detected at two Minnesota state parks

A fungus dangerous to bats has been confirmed at Soudan Underground Mine State Park and Forestville/Mystery Cave State Park, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The fungus is known to cause white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that is harmful and mostly can be fatal to hibernating bats and has decimated bat populations in the eastern portions of the United States and Canada.
 

Forest Service Scientists Identify Key Fungal Species that Help Explain Mysteries of White-Nose Syndrome

MADISON, WI, July 25, 2013 - U.S. Forest Service researchers have identified what may be a key to unraveling some of the mysteries of White Nose Syndrome: the closest known non-disease causing relatives of the fungus that causes WNS. These fungi, many of them still without formal Latin names, live in bat hibernation sites and even directly on bats, but they do not cause the devastating disease that has killed millions of bats in the eastern United States. Researchers hope to use these fungi to understand why one fungus can be deadly to bats while its close relatives are benign.
 

Fungus that kills bats prompts continued precautions at Arkansas caves

A low level of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats has been detected in two north Arkansas caves. The fungus was discovered in a cave at Devil’s Den State Park in Washington County and a private cave located in southern Baxter County. No bat deaths due to white-nose syndrome are known to have occurred in Arkansas.
 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Awards Grants to 28 States for Work on Deadly Bat Disease (June 2013)

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced grant awards totaling $950,694 to twenty-eight states for white-nose syndrome (WNS) projects. State natural resource agencies will use the funds to support research, monitor bat populations and detect and respond to white-nose syndrome, a disease that afflicts bats.
 

WNS detected in TVA cave in Alabama (News release, April 18, 2013)

The fast-spreading fungus that causes the deadly white-nose syndrome in bats has been found in Collier Cave in northwestern Alabama on property managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority.
 

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