White-nose syndrome news

Bat disease fungus found to be widespread in northeast China

October 29, 2015 Contact: Tim Stephens (831) 459-4352; stephens@ucsc.edu   Bat disease fungus found to be widespread in northeast China   Discovery greatly expands the known distribution of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome, which has decimated bat populations in North America     SANTA CRUZ, CA--Bats in northeast China are infected with the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome, a deadly disease that has decimated bat populations in North America since it first appeared in upstate New York in 2006. A team of American and Chinese researchers found the...
 

Bat Week is October 25-31!

Second Annual Bat Week Set to Launch Nationwide Ambitious goal to produce thousands of bat houses seeks to inspire the public to save embattled bat populations October 14, 2015: Washington, D.C. – Today the Bat Week organizing team, comprised of representatives from multiple conservation organizations, federal agencies and business, announced details for the second annual Bat Week. The celebratory week, which will be October 25-31, includes a Signature Event on Capitol Hill, a week long social media campaign aimed to engage and educate the public on bats, and a Guinness World Record...
 

Hibernating bats mount a partial immune response against white-nose syndrome

October 1, 2015 CONTACT: Ken Field, e-mail: kfield@bucknell.edu, phone: +1.570.577.3814 Since it was first discovered in North America in 2007, white-nose syndrome has killed more than 5.7 million bats. In the northeast, bat populations have been devastated, declining to less than 5 percent of their former numbers in some regions. But new research from Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pa., may finally shed some light on the disease that remains very much a mystery. “We’ve been trying since 2007 to identify treatments to help the bats defend themselves against white-nose...
 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Awards 2.5 Million Dollars To Address Deadly Bat Disease

September 29, 2015 Contact: Catherine Hibbard, 413-253-8569; Jeremy Coleman, 413-253-8223 As the international response to combat white-nose syndrome continues, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing an additional $2.5 million in grants for research, management and communications projects. These new investments will further the effort to stop the spread of this deadly fungal disease that has killed millions of North American bats, which are critical to the economy and environment, since it was first documented in New York in 2007. The Service provided grants to 26 projects...
 

Declines and Slow Recovery in Little Brown Bat Populations Predicted: Highlights Severity of White-Nose Syndrome and Critical Research Needs

September 28, 2015 Contact Information: U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey Office of Communications and Publishing,12201 Sunrise Valley Dr, MS 119 Reston, VA 20192, Marisa Lubeck Phone: 303-202-4765, Gail Moede Rogall Phone: 608-270-2438 Populations of bats diminished by white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease of hibernating bats, are unlikely to return to healthy levels in the near future, according to new U.S. Geological Survey research. USGS and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientists recently evaluated the potential for populations of little brown bats in...
 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Awards Grants to 35 States, District of Columbia for Work on Deadly Bat Disease

July 1, 2015: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced grant awards totaling just under $1 million to 35 states and the District of Columbia for white-nose syndrome (WNS) projects. State natural resource agencies will use the funds to support research, monitor bat populations and prepare for and respond to WNS, a disease that afflicts bats
 

Grants available for white-nose syndrome research from Bat Conservation International and The Nature Conservancy

Bat Conservation, International and The Nature Conservancy are committed to supporting solution oriented research that prevents the spread and/or effects of White-nose Syndrome and the fungus that causes it, Pseudogymnoascus destructans. As such, we are pleased to announce the availability of funding for research projects that identify mechanisms to control the fungal disease White-nose Syndrome and its causative agent. This opportunity is available to all state and federal personnel, non-governmental organizations, universities, and private or independent researchers. Proposals for up to...
 

U.S. Forest Service publishes plan for North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat)

June 1, 2015 Asheville, NC — A report just published online by the Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) provides detailed guidelines for participating in the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat), an international multiagency program created to provide the data needed to make effective decisions about bat populations across the North American continent. Susan Loeb, SRS research ecologist, served as lead author on A Plan for the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat), which represents the first step in establishing the NABat monitoring program for bats in North...
 

White-nose syndrome found in bats in the Ouachita and Ozark Mountains in Arkansas

LITTLE ROCK - More incidences of bats infected with white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease deadly to bats, have been found at several locations in the Ouachita Mountains and in the Ozark Mountains. White-nose Syndrome has now been confirmed on bats in caves in Franklin and Searcy counties and the fungus associated with WNS has been found in mines in Garland and Polk counties. The confirmation came after bats from a number of sites were tested by the National Wildlife Health Center and by the Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics at Northern Arizona University.
 

Recent research may help with future treatment of bats with white-nose syndrome

After several years of research to better understand white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that has killed more than 5 million bats since it was discovered in 2007, scientists are beginning to see promising results that could eventually help treat and recover affected bat species. On May 19 the U.S. Forest Service and partners released bats in Missouri that had WNS last fall but were treated during the past winter as part of a series of experiments the agency is conducting to identify potential treatments for the deadly bat disease. This work complements other ongoing research into WNS...