White-nose syndrome news

Updated "Cave Advisory": Recommendations for managing access to subterranean bat roosts to reduce the impacts of white-nose syndrome in bats

Recommendations to reduce the potential for humans to disturb hibernating bats or inadvertently transport the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome to uncontaminated bat habitats. This guidance was produced by the interagency national response to white-nose syndrome through the White-nose Syndrome Disease Management Working Group.
 

Bats in Asia found to have resistance to white-nose syndrome fungus. New findings suggest at least some declining North American bat species could eventually evolve resistance to the devastating disease

March 9, 2016 Contact: Tim Stephens (831) 459-4352; stephens@ucsc.edu For Immediate Release SANTA CRUZ, CA--As the deadly bat disease called white-nose syndrome continues to spread across North America, scientists are studying bats in China to understand how they are able to survive infections with the same fungus that has wiped out millions of North American bats. By comparing disease dynamics in North American and Asian bat populations, researchers have found evidence that Asian bat species have much lower levels of infection than North American species and therefore are resistant to...
 

White-nose syndrome, a disease that can kill bats, confirmed in Minnesota

Media contacts: Ed Quinn, Natural Resource Program consultant, Parks and Trails Division, 651-259-5594, edward.quinn@state.mn.us; Gerda Nordquist, Minnesota Biological Survey supervisor/mammalogist, Ecological and Water Resources Division, 651-259-5124, gerda.nordquist@state.mn.us; Jim Essig, park manager, Lake Vermilion-Soudan Underground Mine State Park, 218-300-7003, jim.essig@state.mn.us White-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that is harmful and usually fatal to hibernating bats, has been confirmed at Lake Vermilion - Soudan Underground Mine State Park in northeastern Minnesota,...
 

Ask your local theater to show white-nose syndrome public service announcements before Batman v Superman!

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice opens March 25 and you can help bats by asking your local theater to run a public service announcement right before the show. Here's a script to help you pitch the idea. Hello! My name is __________. I live in  ___________ and I love going to the movies at your theater. I wanted to get in touch with you about the upcoming release of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Did you know that bats in North America are dying by the millions from a disease called white-nose syndrome? In light of this, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice cast member Ben...
 

Bat Submission Guidelines for White-Nose Syndrome Investigations in 2016 and Update on Surveillance for Pseudogymnoascus destructans

To: Natural Resource/Conservation Managers From: Dr. Jonathan Sleeman, Center Director, USGS National Wildlife Health Center Date: February 25, 2016   The USGS National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) continues to provide sampling kits for swabbing hibernating bats and their surrounding environment to state wildlife agencies nationwide to assist with early detection of Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), and to address specific research priorities identified by state and federal agency partners in conjunction with the White-Nose Syndrome National Plan.   During the first two...
 

Big, dry bats more likely to survive fatal fungus

January 29, 2016   Contact: Mirjam Guesgen, +64 6 951 7298, +64 21 740 414 M.J.Guesgen@massey.ac.nz, news.massey.ac.nz    Bats’ body type and the environmental conditions they hibernate in may explain species differences in bat mortality from deadly fungus, according to a study published today in Science Advances.   White-nose syndrome is a fungal disease of hibernating bats causing dramatic bat population declines in North America since 2007, yet certain bats survive infection by the fungus.   Researchers from Massey University, New Zealand, the United...
 

Decades of bat observations reveal uptick in new causes of mass mortality

January 19, 2016 FORT COLLINS, Colorado – Reports of bat deaths worldwide due to human causes largely unique to the 21st century are markedly rising, according to a new USGS-led analysis published in Mammal Review. Collisions with wind turbines worldwide and the disease white-nose syndrome in North America lead the reported causes of mass death in bats since the onset of the 21st century. These new threats now surpass all prior known causes of bat mortality, natural or attributed to humans. A comprehensive study reveals trends in the occurrence and causes of multiple mortality...
 

Protections Finalized for Threatened Northern Long-Eared Bats

Date: January 13, 2016 Contact: Georgia Parham 812-334-4261 x 1203, Georgia_Parham@fws.gov In an effort to conserve the northern long-eared bat, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced a final rule today that uses flexibilities under section 4(d) of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to tailor protections to areas affected by white-nose syndrome during the bat’s most sensitive life stages. The rule is designed to protect the bat while minimizing regulatory requirements for landowners, land managers, government agencies and others within the species’ range. “The overwhelming...
 

Fungus that causes bat disease detected in Nebraska

November 12, 2015 Contact: Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, Mike Fritz 402-471-5419 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Catherine Hibbard 413-253-8569 LINCOLN – The fungus known to cause white-nose syndrome (WNS) in hibernating bats, a disease that has decimated bat populations in the United States and Canada, was recently discovered for the first time in Nebraska. The fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans – or P. destructans – was detected in samples sent to researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz for testing. The samples were collected in 2015 from bats hibernating in...
 

National Parks work to protect bats and their habitats

Release Date: October 26, 2015 Contacts: Kristy Burnett, kristy_burnett@partner.nps.gov, 970-267-7205 FORT COLLINS – From monitoring the health of bat populations to minimizing the human spread of the deadly fungus that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS), the National Park Service (NPS) has 43 projects underway in more than 40 parks to protect and preserve bats and their habitats. Park personnel undertake a variety of tasks to safeguard bats, their hibernacula, and maternity roosts from WNS, a fungal disease decimating up to 100% of some bat colonies. The NPS dedicated $3 million to...