White-nose syndrome news

Bat Disease Found In Western Maryland Cave, White-Nose Syndrome is likely cause

Annapolis, MD (March 10, 2010) — Several dead bats and over two hundred visibly affected bats were found during a survey conducted in an Allegany County cave near Cumberland on March 5. The bats observed during the survey exhibited a white fungus concentrated around the muzzle of the infected bats. The findings are consistent with White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) and if confirmed, this will be Maryland’s first documented occurrence of the disease.
 

Lab Results Confirm White Nose Syndrome in West Virginia Bats

The U.S. Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Laboratory in Madison, Wisconsin, has confirmed that bats from two Pendleton County caves submitted for testing by Division of Natural Resources wildlife biologists have White-nose Syndrome (WNS).
 

West Virginia's Most Important Bat Cave has White Nose Syndrome

Biologists from the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources (WVDNR) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) report that white-nose syndrome (WNS) has been confirmed in a bat in Hellhole, Pendleton County, West Virginia, by the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study in Athens, Ga.
 

Bats in your belfry? DNREC continues to monitor state's bat population for White-Nose Syndrome

Delaware environmental officials are closely monitoring the state’s bat populations for any occurrence here of White-nose Syndrome (WNS), a disease that has caused mass mortality at bat hibernation sites in northeastern states. While WNS has not been detected in Delaware yet, as many as 1 million bats so far have died from the disease, most of them in states notable for having caves and mines where bats colonize when hibernating.
 

Fish and Wildlife Service Awards $800,000 in Grants to Explore Cause, Control of White-Nose Syndrome in Bats

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will give 6 grant awards totaling $800,000 to research efforts that will explore the cause and control of white-nose syndrome.
 

Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Bat Barn Project

Once slated for demolition, a barn at Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge is being rehabilitated to continue supporting a maternity colony of some 1,500 little and big brown bats, the only known bat colony in Salem County, N.J.
 

Bats on your property? Report colonies to MassWildlife

With the onset of hot, humid weather, Bay State homeowners may discover bats residing in their homes. Because Massachusetts and other northeastern states are experiencing a sudden and unexpected decline of bat populations due to a white powdery fungus on bat faces called White Nose Syndrome (WNS), the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife (MassWildlife) is asking anyone with a summer colony of ten bats or more on their property to report that information to agency biologists. Little Brown Bats and Big Brown Bats are the most likely species to be found in buildings. Please report the colony's...
 

White Nose Syndrome Affects N.H. Bats this Summer, Peterborough Colony Decimated

A bat colony in Peterborough, NH, has sustained a catastrophic level of deaths due to an epidemic of white nose syndrome. More reports have come in from other New Hampshire towns about young bats dying.
 

Division of Fish & Wildlife’s Delaware Bat Count 2009 gets set to take wing

Seen any bats lately? More important, seen many bats lately? If so, your sightings could be beneficial to the environment and play a key part in Delaware Bat Count 2009. The Delaware Division of Fish & Wildlife is looking for volunteers to help locate bat roosts and count the bats as they exit their day-time time hangouts.
 

DE NREC monitors bat population for White-nose Syndrome

Delaware environmental officials are closely monitoring the state’s bat populations for any occurrence here of White-nose Syndrome (WNS), a disease that has caused mass mortality—in some cases as much as 100 percent attrition—at hibernation sites in northeastern states. While WNS has not been detected in Delaware, as many as 1 million bats so far have died from the disease, most of them in states with caves and mines that bats colonize when hibernating.