White-nose syndrome news

Relationships of three species of bats impacted by white-nose syndrome to forest condition and management

U.S. Forest service General Technical report by Silvis, A.; Perry, Roger; Ford, W.M.   Description: Forest management activities can have substantial effects on forest structure and community composition and response of wildlife therein. Bats can be highly influenced by these structural changes, and understanding how forest management affects day-roost and foraging ecology of bats is currently a paramount conservation issue. With populations of many cave-hibernating bat species in eastern North America declining as a result of whitenose syndrome (WNS), it is increasingly critical to...
 

Deadly bat fungus in Washington State likely originated in Eastern U.S.

News Release - August 3, 2016  Contact: Marisa Lubeck, USGS: 303-526-6694 mlubeck@usgs.gov Gail Moede Rogall, USGS: 608-270-2438, gmrogall@usgs.gov Jane Hodgins, Forest Service   651-649-5281, jmhodgins@fs.fed.us   The bat-killing fungus recently detected for the first time in western North America is genetically similar to strains found in the eastern United States and did not likely originate in Eurasia, according to a study published today in the journal mSphere.   The findings have implications for resource managers...
 

White-nose syndrome fungus found on second bat in Washington state

In March 2016, white-nose syndrome (WNS) was confirmed in the state of Washington in a little brown bat from King County – the first recorded occurrence of this devastating bat disease in western North America.   Recently, a silver-haired bat from the same county also tested positive for Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), the fungus that causes WNS. However, this silver-haired bat did not show signs, such as visible fungal growth or lesions, of having actually contracted WNS, according to the U.S. Geological Survey and the WashingtonDepartment of Fish...
 

The Nature Conservancy and Bat Conservation International request proposals for white-nose syndrome research

Bat Conservation, International and The Nature Conservancy are committed to supporting solution-oriented research that reduces or slows the spread and/or effects of White-nose Syndrome and the fungus that causes it, Pseudogymnoascus destructans. As such, we are pleased to announce the availability of funding for research projects that identify mechanisms to control the fungal disease White-nose Syndrome and its causative agent. This opportunity is available to all state and federal personnel, nongovernmental organizations, universities, and private or independent researchers. Award...
 

DEM confirms presence of fungal disease affecting bats in Rhode Island

May 5, 2016 Contact: Gail Mastrati 222-4700 ext. 2402 The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) announces that white-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease that is an often fatal to bats, has been confirmed for the first time in Rhode Island. A tri-colored bat hibernating in Newport County has tested positive for the presence of the disease, and soil samples collected from two other locations in Newport County confirmed the presence of fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), which causes the disease. There is no evidence that the disease poses a threat to humans,...
 

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife launches online bat reporting site

April 14, 2016 SALEM, Ore - With the recent confirmation of White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) in a little brown bat in Washington State, ODFW activated anonline bat reporting website. Anyone finding a dead bat or who observes bats flying during the day or during freezing weather should report this via the online site or call the ODFW Wildlife Health Hotline at 866-968-2600. ODFW veterinarian Colin Gillin said WNS is a fungal disease occurring in hibernating bats that has killed more than six million bats since 2006 when it was...
 

Idaho heightens response efforts for white-nose syndrome

For immediate release: April 13, 2016 Contact: Rita Dixon, Idaho Department of Fish and Game rita.dixon@idfg.idaho.gov, 208-287-2735 Mark Drew, Idaho Department of Fish and Game mark.drew@idfg.idaho.gov, 208-939-9171   BOISE - The recent confirmation of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease of hibernating bats, in Washington state has heightened concern over bats in Idaho. The primary goal of the state is to prevent the introduction of the fungus that causes WNS while preparing for its potential arrival. Click on link for full press release.
 

National white-nose syndrome decontamination protocol, April 2016

The latest formal revision of the national decontamination protocol to prevent spread of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome. This document is the product of a collaborative effort between with multiple federal and state agencies and several non-governmental organizations.
 

Bat with white-nose syndrome confirmed in Washington state

March 31, 2016 OLYMPIA – White-nose syndrome (WNS) has been confirmed in a little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) found near North Bend – the first recorded occurrence of this devastating bat disease in western North America. The presence of this disease was verified by the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center. WNS has spread quickly among bats in other affected areas, killing more than six million beneficial insect-eating bats in North America since it was first documented nearly a decade ago. WNS is not known to pose a threat to humans, pets, livestock...
 

Updated "Cave Advisory": Recommendations for managing access to subterranean bat roosts to reduce the impacts of white-nose syndrome in bats

Recommendations to reduce the potential for humans to disturb hibernating bats or inadvertently transport the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome to uncontaminated bat habitats. This guidance was produced by the interagency national response to white-nose syndrome through the White-nose Syndrome Disease Management Working Group.