White-nose syndrome news

TWRA Confirms First Cases of White Nose Syndrome in Tennessee Bats

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has confirmed that two Tennessee bats have tested positive for white nose syndrome.
 

Agencies and Partners Intensify WNS Research to Save Bats

State Wildlife Agencies like the Pennsylvania Game Commission are ratcheting up their response to white nose syndrome in order to better understand the disease and hopefully slow its spread to other states.
 

Deadly Fungus Threatens 9 Bat Species in GA, KY, NC, SC and TN Expert Says

A leading bat expert with the USDA Forest Service's Southern Research Station identified nine bat species in Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee that she believes are severely threatened by white nose syndrome.
 

Ozark National Scenic Riverways News Release: Ozark NSR Closes All Caves after White-Nose Syndrome is Discovered in Shannon County

Van Buren, MO - Officials at Ozark National Scenic Riverways have announced the closure of all caves in the park effective immediately. On May 2 bat researchers from Missouri State University found an infectious fungus in five gray bats netted just outside a cave in Shannon County, Missouri. The bats tested positive in a genetics test for the Geomyces destructans fungus, which causes White-Nose Syndrome (WNS). Scars on their wings were a clue that the bats probably were infected over the winter, when the fungus grows on the bats’ faces and skin during hibernation. The cool, damp conditions in...
 

$450,000 in Grants Goes to States for White-Nose Syndrome Work

Twenty-three states are receiving a total of $450,000 in grants for white-nose syndrome projects. State natural resource agencies will use the funds for surveillance and monitoring of caves and mines where bats hibernate, preparing state response plans, and other related projects.
 

Fungus associated with White-nose Syndrome detected in Delaware bats

Delaware environmental officials have confirmed the fungus associated with White-nose Syndrome (WNS) on bats in two locations in New Castle County. The disease is characterized by a white fungus on the noses, wings, tails and ears of bats.
 

Fungus associated with White-nose Syndrome detected in Delaware bats

No threat posed to humans, pets, livestock or property; Division of Fish and Wildlife continues to monitor Delaware bats for impacts from WNS Delaware environmental officials have confirmed the fungus associated with White-nose Syndrome (WNS) on bats in two locations in New Castle County. The disease is characterized by a white fungus on the noses, wings, tails and ears of bats. The fungus thrives in cold temperatures and is seen on bats in caves and mines in the northeast, Canada and, more recently, in Tennessee and Missouri.
 

IDNR Closing State Owned and Managed Caves

Move intended to help slow spread of white-nose syndrome killing bats in northeastern states and recently confirmed in the Midwest SPRINGFIELD, IL – The Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) is closing state-owned and managed caves that support bat populations as part of a national effort to slow the spread of the mysterious white-nose syndrome affecting bats in the northeastern United States.
 

Bat Tests Positive For White Nose Syndrome Fungus

Biologists at Great Smoky Mountains National Park have received confirmation that an Indiana bat collected from its hibernating refuge in the park’s White Oak Blowhole cave has tested positive for Geomyces destructans, the fungus and the presumptive causative agent of White Nose Syndrome (WNS).
 

White Nose Syndrome Continues to Decimate Bat Populations Outlook for Connecticut’s Bats is Bleak

A syndrome that attacks hibernating bats continues to kill them at alarming rates both in Connecticut and in expanding areas range-wide, which will lead to a dramatic reduction in the size of the state’s bat population this summer, according to wildlife experts at the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).