White-nose syndrome news

Culprit Identified: Fungus Causes Deadly Bat Disease

The appropriately named fungus Geomyces destructans is the cause of deadly white-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats, according to research published today in the journal Nature.
 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces 2012 Request for Proposals for WNS research

This opportunity is open to all State and Federal agency personnel, as well as non-governmental organizations, university, and private researchers. We anticipate that up to $1 million will be available for high priority research projects through this request for proposal (RFP) process. The announcement will be open for 45 days, with proposals due 4 December 2011. Please visit www.grants.gov for the official notice, found under opportunity # FWS-R5-ES-12-001. Before submitting a proposal for WNS funds, please carefully review all the information and instructions in this RFP.
 

Mammoth Cave National Park celebrates International Bat Night on August 27, 2011

Saturday, August 27, is Bat Night at Mammoth Cave National Park and around the world. Park staff have scheduled activities during daylight hours, and also at dusk, the prime time for viewing bats.
 

Review Finds Endangered Species Protection May Be Warranted for Two Bat Species

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) today announced the eastern small-footed and northern long-eared bats may warrant federal protection as threatened or endangered species, following an initial review of a petition seeking to protect the species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).
 

Kurta to Spend Next Four Years Underground

An award of $122,822 from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Division, is enabling Allen Kurta of Biology to continue for another four years his surveys on bats in the numerous abandoned underground copper and iron mines and caves in northern Michigan, primarily the Upper Peninsula.
 

Bat Disease, White-Nose Syndrome, Confirmed in Maine

The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife has received confirmation that white-nose syndrome, a disease that has killed more than one million bats in eastern North America, now is in Maine. Until this year, Maine appeared to be insulated from white-nose syndrome while states and provinces outside its borders were not. However, during surveys conducted by MDIF&W biologists this spring, bats at two sites in Oxford County displayed visible signs of white-nose syndrome fungus on their wings and muzzles. Carcasses collected from one of the sites were sent to the U.S. Geological...
 

Bat Disease, White-Nose Syndrome, Confirmed in Maine; Not Harmful to Humans, but Deadly to Bats

AUGUSTA, Maine – The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife has received confirmation that white-nose syndrome, a disease that has killed more than one million bats in eastern North America, now is in Maine
 

Fish and Wildlife Service Unveils National Plan to Combat White Nose Syndrome in Bats

The Department of the Interior’s U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today unveiled a national management plan to address the threat posed by white-nose syndrome, which has killed more than a million hibernating bats in eastern North America since it was discovered near Albany, New York in 2006.