White-nose syndrome news

Service Awards $1.4 Million in Grants for Research and Management of White-nose Syndrome in Bats

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced seven grant awards totaling approximately $1.4 million to continue the investigation of white-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats, and to identify ways to manage it.
 

USFWS announces Request for Proposals (RFP): 2012 WNS Grants to States

The goal of the White-nose Syndrome Grants to States is to provide needed assistance to state agencies in addressing the spread of WNS, the resultant loss of cave bat populations, and the threat to federally listed bat species. We expect up to $950,000 in funds for this program.
 

USFWS announces Request for Proposals (RFP): 2012 WNS Grants to States

The goal of the White-nose Syndrome Grants to States is to provide needed assistance to state agencies in addressing the spread of WNS, the resultant loss of cave bat populations, and the threat to federally listed bat species. We expect up to $950,000 in funds for this program.
 

Missouri confirms WNS in bats

The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) recently received confirmation that a deadly disease in bats called “White-Nose Syndrome” (WNS) has been found in three bats from two caves in Lincoln County.
 

White-Nose Syndrome Confirmed in Acadia National Park

White-nose syndrome (WNS), the disease that has recently killed millions of bats in eastern North America, has been confirmed in bats at Acadia National Park in Maine. This is the first confirmation of WNS in Acadia National Park and in Hancock County.
 

White-Nose Syndrome Confirmed at Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Biologists at Great Smoky Mountains National Park have confirmed that both a tricolored and a little brown bat found in a park cave tested positive for white-nose syndrome (WNS). This discovery transitions the park from only finding evidence of the fungus that causes WNS in a cave to now finding animals actively affected by the disease.
 

White-Nose Syndrome in Bats Confirmed in Alabama

White-nose syndrome (WNS), the disease that has killed millions of bats in eastern North America, has been confirmed in bats in the Russell Cave complex in Jackson County, marking the arrival of the disease in Alabama.
 

White-nose syndrome spreads in Kentucky

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources has detected white-nose syndrome in bats at three Breckinridge County caves.
 

Histopathology Confirms White-Nose Syndrome in Bats in Europe

White-nose syndrome, associated with the fungal skin infection geomycosis, caused regional population collapse in bats in North America. This study, based on histopathology, show the presence of white-nose syndrome in Europe.