White-nose syndrome news

White-Nose Syndrome Found in Four Additional Illinois Counties

SPRINGFIELD, IL – White-nose syndrome, a fungal disease that has killed millions of bats in North America, has been found in four new Illinois counties. Tests conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin found five bats submitted from Union, Saline, Johnson, and Jackson Counties were positive for the disease. These are the first confirmed records in these counties. The disease was first discovered in Illinois in 2013 in Hardin, LaSalle, Monroe and Pope Counties. Click on file for full release
 

Project Edubat Inspires Kids to Learn about Bats, White-Nose Syndrome

Contact: Catherine Hibbard: 413-531-4276, Cindy Sandeno: 414-297-1254 “Bats ROCK!” said third-grader Samantha Colaw. Samantha, daughter of schoolteacher Julie Colaw, became a bat crusader after her mother discovered Project Edubat, a newly launched educational program about these often-misunderstood flying mammals funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The brainchild of Cindy Sandeno of the U.S. Forest Service and fellow bat enthusiasts, Project Edubat includes curricula that meet national educational requirements for students in elementary grades through high school. Posters...
 

Deadly White-Nose Syndrome Impacts Bats at Mammoth Cave National Park

MAMMOTH CAVE, Ky., February 23, 2015 – A deadly disease known as white-nose syndrome (WNS) is taking its toll on the bats at Mammoth Cave National Park. Some bat species in the park have declined as much as 80 percent compared to 2013 numbers. Across the eastern United States and Canada, WNS has killed millions of bats since 2006. The park is continuing with scheduled cave tours, adapting times and routes in response to bat activity. Bat research and bat monitoring are also ongoing. “This is a wildlife crisis, unprecedented in our time,” said Mammoth Cave Superintendent Sarah...
 

First bats to die from white-nose syndrome this winter reported in Keweenaw County, Michigan

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Jan. 23, 2015 Contact: Dan O’Brien, 517-336-5035 or Ed Golder, 517-284-581 Today, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced that it has received the first reports this winter of bats dying from white-nose syndrome. Members of the public found dead bats outside the opening of an abandoned copper mine near Mohawk in Keweenaw County and reported it to DNR field staff. White-nose syndrome was first discovered in Michigan in late winter 2014 in Alpena, Dickinson, Keweenaw, Mackinac and Ontonagon counties. Widespread die-offs of hibernating bats are...
 

Early surveillance in Wisconsin reveals positive test for the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome

By Central Office January 20, 2015 MADISON - Early winter surveillance of 15 caves revealed that two bats in a single Dane County cave tested positive for genetic markers of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome. Swabs taken from two eastern pipistrelles from a single site in November 2014 tested positive for the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), which causes white-nose syndrome in hibernating bats. This find represents both a new county and a new bat species infected with Pd in Wisconsin. The site where Pd was detected was not Cave of the Mounds, a popular show cave...
 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes special rule to focus protections for northern long-eared bat: rule would apply if species is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

In response to the rapid and severe decline of the northern long-eared bat – a species important for crop pest control – the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing a special rule under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) that would provide the maximum benefit to the species while limiting the regulatory burden on the public. If finalized, the rule, under section 4(d) of the ESA, would apply only in the event the Service lists the bat as “threatened.” The Service’s proposal will appear in the Federal Register Jan. 16, 2015, opening a 60-day public comment period. Click on press...
 

How Does White-Nose Syndrome Kill Bats? New Science Helps Explain Hibernation Disease

For the first time, scientists have developed a detailed explanation of how white-nose syndrome (WNS) is killing millions of bats in North America, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Wisconsin. The scientists created a model for how the disease progresses from initial infection to death in bats during hibernation.
 

Three bat species listed as endangered under Canada's Species at Risk Act due to white-nose syndrome

December 17, 2014 The Government of Canada has added three species of bats to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (also known as Schedule I of the Species at Risk Act). These three bats species - the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) - have been listed as Endangered, as their survival is imminently threatened by the deadly and highly contagious disease white-nose syndrome.
 

Study of deadly bat disease finds surprising seasonal pattern of infections: new publication

White-nose syndrome fungus can infect an entire bat colony during hibernation, but surviving bats are able to clear the infection after they become active again. SANTA CRUZ, CA--The deadly fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome has spread to bat colonies throughout eastern North America over the past seven years, causing bat populations to crash, with several species now at risk of extinction. The devastating impact of this disease is due in part to the seasonal dynamics of infection and transmission, according to a new study led by scientists at the University of California, Santa...
 

US Fish and Wildlife Service reopens public comment period for northern long-eared bat

The Service is reopening the comment period on our October 2, 2013, proposed rule to list the northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis) as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. We recently received additional information from state agencies within the range of the species, this information is available at http://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/mammals/nlba Reopening the comment period will allow the public to review this information and provide comments on our proposed rule in light of that additional information. Additionally, the public may comment on any aspect of the...
 

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