White-nose syndrome news

White-nose syndrome confirmed in Iowa; more than half of states now confirmed with disease

DES MOINES - White-nose syndrome has been confirmed in Iowa, making it the 26th state to confirm the disease of hibernating bats that has killed more than 5.7 million bats since 2006. Three bats collected in Des Moines County were confirmed to have white-nose syndrome (WNS). Two little brown bats and one northern long-eared bat observed near a cave entrance showed visible signs of WNS during monitoring for the disease. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin confirmed that the bats had WNS. Pseudogymnoascus destructans (P. d.), the...
 

Bacteria Inhibit Bat-Killing Fungus, Could Combat White-Nose Syndrome

UC Santa Cruz researchers are testing the bacteria as a potential treatment to control white-nose syndrome, which is devastating bat populations in North America
 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Protects Northern Long-eared Bat as Threatened Under Endangered Species Act

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Protects Northern Long-eared Bat as Threatened Under Endangered Species Act Also Issues Interim Special Rule that Tailors Protections to Eliminate Unnecessary Restrictions and Provide Regulatory Flexibility for Landowners The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today it is protecting the northern long-eared bat as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), primarily due to the threat posed by white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease that has devastated many bat populations. At the same time, the Service issued an interim special...
 

USGS National Wildlife Health Center Wildlife Health Bulletin 2015-02 Bat Submission Guidelines for White-Nose Syndrome Surveillance and Early Detection of Pseudogymnoascus destructans

To: Natural Resource/Conservation Managers From: Dr. Jonathan Sleeman, Center Director, USGS National Wildlife Health Center Date: March 13, 2015 The USGS National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) has updated the Bat Submission Guidelines for the 2014/2015 white-nose syndrome (WNS) surveillance season. These guidelines, which are posted on the NWHC WNS web page, replace all previous NWHC bat submission criteria. Included are reference charts to assist submitters with selecting priority species and appropriate samples for diagnostic submission based on location. A map that designates WNS...
 

Project Edubat receives Wings Across the Americas Awards

Project EduBat, a new educational program, won a Wings Across the Americas award for bat conservation at the North American Fish and Wildlife Conference in Omaha, Nebraska on March 11, 2015. Led by Cindy Sandeno of the USDA Forest Service, and supported by Carol Zokaites, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, and Gail Moede Rogall, U.S. Geological Survey, Project EduBat addresses the urgent need to educate the public about the ecological and economic importance of bats, as well as the threat that white-nose syndrome poses. The program was funded by a $22,000 grant from...
 

European origins for fungus killing millions of North America’s bats: new study finds genetic link suggesting European origin of Pseudogymnoascus destructans fungus, the causative agent of white-nose syndrome

March 16, 2015 Contact: Jordan Kenny: Communications Management Telephone: +44 (0)1727 733882 Email: jordan@communcationsmanagement.co.uk A fungus that is wiping out millions of North America’s bat population originated in Europe and probably spread to the USA and Canada through human activity such as migration and agriculture. That’s according to new genetic research from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) in partnership with the University of Greifswald and University College Dublin, that is to be published in academic journal, Current Biology. White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a...
 

International bat monitoring research group receives "Wings Across the Americas" award

March 9, 2015 Contact: Suzanna Soileau 406-994-7257 ssoileau@usgs.gov Catherine Puckett 352-377-2469 cpuckett@usgs.gov U.S. Geological Survey bat conservation researchers and their partners are being recognized today with the U.S. Forest Service Wings Across the Americas Research Award for their contributions to the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat). The award will be accepted on behalf of USGS contributions to NABat by Anne Kinsinger, USGS associate director for Ecosystems, at the North American Wildlife Resources Conference in Omaha, Nebr. USGS partners also being...
 

White-nose syndrome found in bats in Independence, Newton and Madison counties in Arkansas

03/06/2015 LITTLE ROCK – Bats from a privately-owned cave in Independence County, a cave on the Buffalo National River in Newton County and a cave on McIlroy Madison County Wildlife Management Area have been confirmed to have white-nose syndrome or the fungus associated with it. The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission confirmed the presence of white-nose syndrome, a disease fatal to several bat species, in two caves early last year. Arkansas now has confirmed bats from four counties have WNS and it is suspected in three others. Since 2010, the AGFC and other public agencies around the...
 

White-Nose Syndrome Found in Four Additional Illinois Counties

SPRINGFIELD, IL – White-nose syndrome, a fungal disease that has killed millions of bats in North America, has been found in four new Illinois counties. Tests conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin found five bats submitted from Union, Saline, Johnson, and Jackson Counties were positive for the disease. These are the first confirmed records in these counties. The disease was first discovered in Illinois in 2013 in Hardin, LaSalle, Monroe and Pope Counties. Click on file for full release
 

Project Edubat Inspires Kids to Learn about Bats, White-Nose Syndrome

Contact: Catherine Hibbard: 413-531-4276, Cindy Sandeno: 414-297-1254 “Bats ROCK!” said third-grader Samantha Colaw. Samantha, daughter of schoolteacher Julie Colaw, became a bat crusader after her mother discovered Project Edubat, a newly launched educational program about these often-misunderstood flying mammals funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The brainchild of Cindy Sandeno of the U.S. Forest Service and fellow bat enthusiasts, Project Edubat includes curricula that meet national educational requirements for students in elementary grades through high school. Posters...
 

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