White-nose syndrome news

Project Edubat receives Wings Across the Americas Awards

Project EduBat, a new educational program, won a Wings Across the Americas award for bat conservation at the North American Fish and Wildlife Conference in Omaha, Nebraska on March 11, 2015. Led by Cindy Sandeno of the USDA Forest Service, and supported by Carol Zokaites, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, and Gail Moede Rogall, U.S. Geological Survey, Project EduBat addresses the urgent need to educate the public about the ecological and economic importance of bats, as well as the threat that white-nose syndrome poses. The program was funded by a $22,000 grant from...
 

European origins for fungus killing millions of North America’s bats: new study finds genetic link suggesting European origin of Pseudogymnoascus destructans fungus, the causative agent of white-nose syndrome

March 16, 2015 Contact: Jordan Kenny: Communications Management Telephone: +44 (0)1727 733882 Email: jordan@communcationsmanagement.co.uk A fungus that is wiping out millions of North America’s bat population originated in Europe and probably spread to the USA and Canada through human activity such as migration and agriculture. That’s according to new genetic research from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) in partnership with the University of Greifswald and University College Dublin, that is to be published in academic journal, Current Biology. White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a...
 

International bat monitoring research group receives "Wings Across the Americas" award

March 9, 2015 Contact: Suzanna Soileau 406-994-7257 ssoileau@usgs.gov Catherine Puckett 352-377-2469 cpuckett@usgs.gov U.S. Geological Survey bat conservation researchers and their partners are being recognized today with the U.S. Forest Service Wings Across the Americas Research Award for their contributions to the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat). The award will be accepted on behalf of USGS contributions to NABat by Anne Kinsinger, USGS associate director for Ecosystems, at the North American Wildlife Resources Conference in Omaha, Nebr. USGS partners also being...
 

White-nose syndrome found in bats in Independence, Newton and Madison counties in Arkansas

03/06/2015 LITTLE ROCK – Bats from a privately-owned cave in Independence County, a cave on the Buffalo National River in Newton County and a cave on McIlroy Madison County Wildlife Management Area have been confirmed to have white-nose syndrome or the fungus associated with it. The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission confirmed the presence of white-nose syndrome, a disease fatal to several bat species, in two caves early last year. Arkansas now has confirmed bats from four counties have WNS and it is suspected in three others. Since 2010, the AGFC and other public agencies around the...
 

White-Nose Syndrome Found in Four Additional Illinois Counties

SPRINGFIELD, IL – White-nose syndrome, a fungal disease that has killed millions of bats in North America, has been found in four new Illinois counties. Tests conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin found five bats submitted from Union, Saline, Johnson, and Jackson Counties were positive for the disease. These are the first confirmed records in these counties. The disease was first discovered in Illinois in 2013 in Hardin, LaSalle, Monroe and Pope Counties. Click on file for full release
 

Project Edubat Inspires Kids to Learn about Bats, White-Nose Syndrome

Contact: Catherine Hibbard: 413-531-4276, Cindy Sandeno: 414-297-1254 “Bats ROCK!” said third-grader Samantha Colaw. Samantha, daughter of schoolteacher Julie Colaw, became a bat crusader after her mother discovered Project Edubat, a newly launched educational program about these often-misunderstood flying mammals funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The brainchild of Cindy Sandeno of the U.S. Forest Service and fellow bat enthusiasts, Project Edubat includes curricula that meet national educational requirements for students in elementary grades through high school. Posters...
 

Deadly White-Nose Syndrome Impacts Bats at Mammoth Cave National Park

MAMMOTH CAVE, Ky., February 23, 2015 – A deadly disease known as white-nose syndrome (WNS) is taking its toll on the bats at Mammoth Cave National Park. Some bat species in the park have declined as much as 80 percent compared to 2013 numbers. Across the eastern United States and Canada, WNS has killed millions of bats since 2006. The park is continuing with scheduled cave tours, adapting times and routes in response to bat activity. Bat research and bat monitoring are also ongoing. “This is a wildlife crisis, unprecedented in our time,” said Mammoth Cave Superintendent Sarah...
 

First bats to die from white-nose syndrome this winter reported in Keweenaw County, Michigan

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Jan. 23, 2015 Contact: Dan O’Brien, 517-336-5035 or Ed Golder, 517-284-581 Today, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced that it has received the first reports this winter of bats dying from white-nose syndrome. Members of the public found dead bats outside the opening of an abandoned copper mine near Mohawk in Keweenaw County and reported it to DNR field staff. White-nose syndrome was first discovered in Michigan in late winter 2014 in Alpena, Dickinson, Keweenaw, Mackinac and Ontonagon counties. Widespread die-offs of hibernating bats are...
 

Early surveillance in Wisconsin reveals positive test for the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome

By Central Office January 20, 2015 MADISON - Early winter surveillance of 15 caves revealed that two bats in a single Dane County cave tested positive for genetic markers of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome. Swabs taken from two eastern pipistrelles from a single site in November 2014 tested positive for the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), which causes white-nose syndrome in hibernating bats. This find represents both a new county and a new bat species infected with Pd in Wisconsin. The site where Pd was detected was not Cave of the Mounds, a popular show cave...
 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes special rule to focus protections for northern long-eared bat: rule would apply if species is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

In response to the rapid and severe decline of the northern long-eared bat – a species important for crop pest control – the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing a special rule under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) that would provide the maximum benefit to the species while limiting the regulatory burden on the public. If finalized, the rule, under section 4(d) of the ESA, would apply only in the event the Service lists the bat as “threatened.” The Service’s proposal will appear in the Federal Register Jan. 16, 2015, opening a 60-day public comment period. Click on press...
 

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