White-nose syndrome news

Bat Submission Guidelines for White-Nose Syndrome Investigations in 2016 and Update on Surveillance for Pseudogymnoascus destructans

To: Natural Resource/Conservation Managers From: Dr. Jonathan Sleeman, Center Director, USGS National Wildlife Health Center Date: February 25, 2016   The USGS National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) continues to provide sampling kits for swabbing hibernating bats and their surrounding environment to state wildlife agencies nationwide to assist with early detection of Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), and to address specific research priorities identified by state and federal agency partners in conjunction with the White-Nose Syndrome National Plan.   During the first two...
 

Big, dry bats more likely to survive fatal fungus

January 29, 2016   Contact: Mirjam Guesgen, +64 6 951 7298, +64 21 740 414 M.J.Guesgen@massey.ac.nz, news.massey.ac.nz    Bats’ body type and the environmental conditions they hibernate in may explain species differences in bat mortality from deadly fungus, according to a study published today in Science Advances.   White-nose syndrome is a fungal disease of hibernating bats causing dramatic bat population declines in North America since 2007, yet certain bats survive infection by the fungus.   Researchers from Massey University, New Zealand, the United...
 

Decades of bat observations reveal uptick in new causes of mass mortality

January 19, 2016 FORT COLLINS, Colorado – Reports of bat deaths worldwide due to human causes largely unique to the 21st century are markedly rising, according to a new USGS-led analysis published in Mammal Review. Collisions with wind turbines worldwide and the disease white-nose syndrome in North America lead the reported causes of mass death in bats since the onset of the 21st century. These new threats now surpass all prior known causes of bat mortality, natural or attributed to humans. A comprehensive study reveals trends in the occurrence and causes of multiple mortality...
 

Protections Finalized for Threatened Northern Long-Eared Bats

Date: January 13, 2016 Contact: Georgia Parham 812-334-4261 x 1203, Georgia_Parham@fws.gov In an effort to conserve the northern long-eared bat, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced a final rule today that uses flexibilities under section 4(d) of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to tailor protections to areas affected by white-nose syndrome during the bat’s most sensitive life stages. The rule is designed to protect the bat while minimizing regulatory requirements for landowners, land managers, government agencies and others within the species’ range. “The overwhelming...
 

Fungus that causes bat disease detected in Nebraska

November 12, 2015 Contact: Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, Mike Fritz 402-471-5419 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Catherine Hibbard 413-253-8569 LINCOLN – The fungus known to cause white-nose syndrome (WNS) in hibernating bats, a disease that has decimated bat populations in the United States and Canada, was recently discovered for the first time in Nebraska. The fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans – or P. destructans – was detected in samples sent to researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz for testing. The samples were collected in 2015 from bats hibernating in...
 

National Parks work to protect bats and their habitats

Release Date: October 26, 2015 Contacts: Kristy Burnett, kristy_burnett@partner.nps.gov, 970-267-7205 FORT COLLINS – From monitoring the health of bat populations to minimizing the human spread of the deadly fungus that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS), the National Park Service (NPS) has 43 projects underway in more than 40 parks to protect and preserve bats and their habitats. Park personnel undertake a variety of tasks to safeguard bats, their hibernacula, and maternity roosts from WNS, a fungal disease decimating up to 100% of some bat colonies. The NPS dedicated $3 million to...
 

Bat disease fungus found to be widespread in northeast China

October 29, 2015 Contact: Tim Stephens (831) 459-4352; stephens@ucsc.edu   Bat disease fungus found to be widespread in northeast China   Discovery greatly expands the known distribution of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome, which has decimated bat populations in North America     SANTA CRUZ, CA--Bats in northeast China are infected with the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome, a deadly disease that has decimated bat populations in North America since it first appeared in upstate New York in 2006. A team of American and Chinese researchers found the...
 

Bat Week is October 25-31!

Second Annual Bat Week Set to Launch Nationwide Ambitious goal to produce thousands of bat houses seeks to inspire the public to save embattled bat populations October 14, 2015: Washington, D.C. – Today the Bat Week organizing team, comprised of representatives from multiple conservation organizations, federal agencies and business, announced details for the second annual Bat Week. The celebratory week, which will be October 25-31, includes a Signature Event on Capitol Hill, a week long social media campaign aimed to engage and educate the public on bats, and a Guinness World Record...
 

Hibernating bats mount a partial immune response against white-nose syndrome

October 1, 2015 CONTACT: Ken Field, e-mail: kfield@bucknell.edu, phone: +1.570.577.3814 Since it was first discovered in North America in 2007, white-nose syndrome has killed more than 5.7 million bats. In the northeast, bat populations have been devastated, declining to less than 5 percent of their former numbers in some regions. But new research from Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pa., may finally shed some light on the disease that remains very much a mystery. “We’ve been trying since 2007 to identify treatments to help the bats defend themselves against white-nose...
 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Awards 2.5 Million Dollars To Address Deadly Bat Disease

September 29, 2015 Contact: Catherine Hibbard, 413-253-8569; Jeremy Coleman, 413-253-8223 As the international response to combat white-nose syndrome continues, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing an additional $2.5 million in grants for research, management and communications projects. These new investments will further the effort to stop the spread of this deadly fungal disease that has killed millions of North American bats, which are critical to the economy and environment, since it was first documented in New York in 2007. The Service provided grants to 26 projects...