White-nose syndrome news

Fungus that Causes White-Nose Syndrome in Bats Detected in South Dakota for the First Time

Contacts: National Park Service: Alex Picavet, 402-661-1840, alexandra_picavet@nps.gov U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: Catherine Hibbard, 413-253-8569, catherine_hibbard@fws.gov South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks: Emily Kiel, 605-773-3904, Emily.Kiel@state.sd.us University of Wyoming: Ian Abernethy, 307-766-3035, fisher@uwyo.edu   May 31, 2018 SOUTH DAKOTA – A fungus that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS), a deadly disease of bats, has been detected on bats in South Dakota for the first time. The fungus was detected on one western smallfooted bat (Myotis ciliolabrum)...

Fungus that Causes White-Nose Syndrome in Bats Detected in South Dakota for the First Time

Contacts: National Park Service: Alex Picavet, 402-661-1840, alexandra_picavet@nps.gov U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: Catherine Hibbard, 413-253-8569, catherine_hibbard@fws.gov South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks: Emily Kiel, 605-773-3904, Emily.Kiel@state.sd.us University of Wyoming: Ian Abernethy, 307-766-3035, fisher@uwyo.edu   May 31, 2018 SOUTH DAKOTA – A fungus that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS), a deadly disease of bats, has been detected on bats in South Dakota for the first time. The fungus was detected on one western smallfooted bat (Myotis ciliolabrum)...

Fungus that Causes White-Nose Syndrome in Bats Detected in South Dakota for the First Time

Contacts: National Park Service: Alex Picavet, 402-661-1840, alexandra_picavet@nps.gov U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: Catherine Hibbard, 413-253-8569, catherine_hibbard@fws.gov South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks: Emily Kiel, 605-773-3904, Emily.Kiel@state.sd.us University of Wyoming: Ian Abernethy, 307-766-3035, fisher@uwyo.edu   May 31, 2018 SOUTH DAKOTA – A fungus that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS), a deadly disease of bats, has been detected on bats in South Dakota for the first time. The fungus was detected on one western smallfooted bat (Myotis ciliolabrum)...

Fungus that Causes White-Nose Syndrome in Bats Detected in South Dakota for the First Time

Contacts: National Park Service: Alex Picavet, 402-661-1840, alexandra_picavet@nps.gov U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: Catherine Hibbard, 413-253-8569, catherine_hibbard@fws.gov South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks: Emily Kiel, 605-773-3904, Emily.Kiel@state.sd.us University of Wyoming: Ian Abernethy, 307-766-3035, fisher@uwyo.edu   May 31, 2018 SOUTH DAKOTA – A fungus that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS), a deadly disease of bats, has been detected on bats in South Dakota for the first time. The fungus was detected on one western smallfooted bat (Myotis ciliolabrum)...

First Cave Myotis Bat With White-nose Syndrome Found In Kansas

PRATT, Kansas – White-nose sydrome (WNS), a fungal disease that affects hibernating bats, has been confirmed for the first time on a cave myotis bat (Myotis velifer), which was collected in Kansas. This brings the total number of bat species confirmed with the deadly fungal disease in North America to 10. Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism (KDWPT) biologists collected sick and dead cave myotis, a bat species common in Kansas, in Barber, Comanche, and Kiowa counties. Samples were sent to the U.S. Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wis. for testing, and...

Precursor to Bat Disease Continues to Spread in Oklahoma

Surveillance for white-nose syndrome and the fungus that causes the bat disease found that bats in seven Oklahoma counties – Adair, Cherokee, Delaware, LeFlore, Ottawa, Sequoyah, and Woodward counties – have been infected to date. The fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, was first detected in New York in the winter of 2006–2007 and had spread to Oklahoma by the winter of 2014–2015. Bats play an important ecological role; each bat can eat up to 3,000 insects, including mosquitoes and agricultural pests, in a single night. Biologists are concerned how white-nose syndrome will affect Oklahoma...