White-nose syndrome news

2018 White-nose Syndrome Research Grants from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Open

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is now accepting proposals for research to support the national response to white-nose syndrome. This funding opportunity is available on grants.gov, F18AS00119 . Proposals will be accepted until September 30, 2018, or until funds are depleted. Proposals will be reviewed on a rolling basis throughout this period. See the funding opportunity announcement for a timeline of submission and anticipated notification times. Competitive proposals will address the following priorities: 1) Understand mechanisms and patterns of survival and persistence between and...

White-nose Syndrome Grants to States Open; Deadline May 9

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is pleased to announce the availability of financial assistance to state and District of Columbia wildlife agencies for issues related directly to the management of white-nose syndrome. State wildlife management agencies are encouraged to apply for this opportunity. The most competitive proposals will include activities relevant to the status of white-nose syndrome and/or Pseudogymnoascus destructans in the state. A total of $1 million is available. The 2018 WNS Grants to States funding opportunity is posted at grants.gov, Funding Opportunity Number...

Fungus Causing White-Nose Syndrome Spreads into Central Texas

First Ever Detection in Popular Mexican Free-Tailed Bat   AUSTIN — The fungus that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats, detected for the first time in Texas in early 2017 in the Panhandle, has now spread into Central Texas. Though no bat deaths have been attributed to WNS in Texas, the syndrome has killed millions of bats in the eastern parts of the United States, raising national concern. A coalition of groups in Texas is continuing work to monitor the spread of the disease. The fungus was detected at several sites in four new counties this year including: 2 sites in Blanco...

Bats With White-nose Syndrome Detected In Kansas

Contact: Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism Ecological Services Section: 620- 672-5911 PRATT – White-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease that affects hibernating bats, has recently been confirmed in Kansas – the 32nd state to confirm the presence of the disease. Several dead bats, collected during cave surveys in Cherokee County in southeast Kansas and Barber County in southcentral Kansas, tested positive for the disease. Surveys were conducted between February 14 and March 1, and samples were tested by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center in...