White-nose syndrome news

Request for Proposals for White-Nose Syndrome Research Grants 2017

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is pleased to announce the availability of research funding in 2017 to investigate issues related directly to the management of white-nose syndrome disease of hibernating bats. This opportunity is open to non-governmental, university, and private researchers, as well as State and Federal agencies, and Tribes. The deadline for proposal submission is May 30th. The Service has targeted up to $1.2 million, with a limit of $250,000 for individual projects, to investigate high-priority questions about white-nose syndrome that will improve our ability to manage...

Micro grants for microbats: announcing fightwns' request for proposals

Fightwns announces their 2017 Request for Proposals for grants to address white-nose syndrome disease of hibernating bats and the causative agent, Pseudogymnoascus destructans. The 'Micro Grants for Microbats' program awards up to $5000 to recipients across North America. This opportunity applies to state and federal personnel, NGO's, academic institutions and private or independent researchers.   Please submit proposals by May 16, 2017.

Fungus that Causes White-nose Syndrome in Bats Detected in Texas

The fungus that causes deadly white-nose syndrome (WNS) in hibernating bats has been detected in Texas for the first time. The fungus was detected on species of hibernating bats in six North Texas Counties: Childress, Collingsworth, Cottle, Hardeman, King, and Scurry. The three species are tri-colored bat, cave myotis, and Townsend’s big-eared bat. This is the first detection of the fungus on both cave myotis and Townsend’s big-eared bats. The Townsend’s big-eared bat has an isolated subspecies in the East, the Virginia Big Eared Bat that has already tested positive for the fungus.

Fungus that Causes White-nose Syndrome in Bats Detected in Texas

The fungus that causes deadly white-nose syndrome (WNS) in hibernating bats has been detected in Texas for the first time. The fungus was detected on species of hibernating bats in six North Texas Counties: Childress, Collingsworth, Cottle, Hardeman, King, and Scurry. The three species are tri-colored bat, cave myotis, and Townsend’s big-eared bat. This is the first detection of the fungus on both cave myotis and Townsend’s big-eared bats. The Townsend’s big-eared bat has an isolated subspecies in the East, the Virginia Big Eared Bat that has already tested positive for the fungus.

Fungus that Causes White-nose Syndrome in Bats Detected in Texas

The fungus that causes deadly white-nose syndrome (WNS) in hibernating bats has been detected in Texas for the first time. The fungus was detected on species of hibernating bats in six North Texas Counties: Childress, Collingsworth, Cottle, Hardeman, King, and Scurry. The three species are tri-colored bat, cave myotis, and Townsend’s big-eared bat. This is the first detection of the fungus on both cave myotis and Townsend’s big-eared bats. The Townsend’s big-eared bat has an isolated subspecies in the East, the Virginia Big Eared Bat that has already tested positive for the fungus.

Fungus that Causes White-nose Syndrome in Bats Detected in Texas

The fungus that causes deadly white-nose syndrome (WNS) in hibernating bats has been detected in Texas for the first time. The fungus was detected on species of hibernating bats in six North Texas Counties: Childress, Collingsworth, Cottle, Hardeman, King, and Scurry. The three species are tri-colored bat, cave myotis, and Townsend’s big-eared bat. This is the first detection of the fungus on both cave myotis and Townsend’s big-eared bats. The Townsend’s big-eared bat has an isolated subspecies in the East, the Virginia Big Eared Bat that has already tested positive for the fungus.

White-nose syndrome confirmed in five more Minnesota counties

Following the pattern observed in neighboring states, white-nose syndrome is now confirmed in six Minnesota counties, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. The DNR confirmed the state's first case of WNS in St. Louis County during bat counts last March.

White-nose syndrome confirmed in Nebraska

White-nose syndrome was confirmed after several dozen dead bats were discovered during a survey of a mine in Cass County. The U.S. Geological Survey's National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin, confirmed the disease in three bats from the mine - a little brown bat, a northern long-eared bat, and a tri-colored bat. Nebraska is the 30th state to confirm the presence of the syndrome.

White-nose syndrome confirmed in Nebraska

White-nose syndrome was confirmed after several dozen dead bats were discovered during a survey of a mine in Cass County. The U.S. Geological Survey's National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin, confirmed the disease in three bats from the mine - a little brown bat, a northern long-eared bat, and a tri-colored bat. Nebraska is the 30th state to confirm the presence of the syndrome.