White-nose syndrome news

White-nose syndrome small grants program is accepting proposals for research and communication needs

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made funds available to support research and communications needs outlined in the White-Nose Syndrome National Plan. This opportunity is open to entities that are not U.S. Federal government agencies. The deadline to submit a proposal is October 12, 2016.   The Wildlife Management Institute coordinates and administers these grants on behalf of the USFWS.  

White-nose syndrome small grants program is accepting proposals for research and communication needs

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made funds available to support research and communications needs outlined in the White-Nose Syndrome National Plan. This opportunity is open to entities that are not U.S. Federal government agencies. The deadline to submit a proposal is October 12, 2016.   The Wildlife Management Institute coordinates and administers these grants on behalf of the USFWS.  

$100,000 Awarded in Grants to Fight Deadly Fungus by Bat Conservation International and Tennessee Chapter of The Nature Conservancy

Austin, Texas (August 24, 2016) – Bat Conservation International (BCI) and the Tennessee Chapter of The Nature Conservancy (TNC) are pleased to award $100,000 in funding to support critical research in the fight against White-nose Syndrome (WNS). Together, BCI and TNC reviewed and selected three solution-oriented projects that aim to identify and develop tools to improve survival of bats vulnerable to WNS. BCI and TNC have chosen to provide critical funding to research projects that are developing approaches to manage the fungus that causes WNS, Pseudogymnoascus destructans(Pd). “...

$100,000 Awarded in Grants to Fight Deadly Fungus by Bat Conservation International and Tennessee Chapter of The Nature Conservancy

Austin, Texas (August 24, 2016) – Bat Conservation International (BCI) and the Tennessee Chapter of The Nature Conservancy (TNC) are pleased to award $100,000 in funding to support critical research in the fight against White-nose Syndrome (WNS). Together, BCI and TNC reviewed and selected three solution-oriented projects that aim to identify and develop tools to improve survival of bats vulnerable to WNS. BCI and TNC have chosen to provide critical funding to research projects that are developing approaches to manage the fungus that causes WNS, Pseudogymnoascus destructans(Pd). “...

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Awards Grants to 34 States, District of Columbia for Work on Deadly Bat Disease

August 9, 2016                                                            Contact: Catherine Hibbard, 413-253-8569 How do states respond to or prepare for white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that affects hibernating bats? It depends on their location. Actions include looking for the fungus that causes...

Relationships of three species of bats impacted by white-nose syndrome to forest condition and management

U.S. Forest service General Technical report by Silvis, A.; Perry, Roger; Ford, W.M.   Description: Forest management activities can have substantial effects on forest structure and community composition and response of wildlife therein. Bats can be highly influenced by these structural changes, and understanding how forest management affects day-roost and foraging ecology of bats is currently a paramount conservation issue. With populations of many cave-hibernating bat species in eastern North America declining as a result of whitenose syndrome (WNS), it is increasingly critical to...

Deadly bat fungus in Washington State likely originated in Eastern U.S.

News Release - August 3, 2016  Contact: Marisa Lubeck, USGS: 303-526-6694 mlubeck@usgs.gov Gail Moede Rogall, USGS: 608-270-2438, gmrogall@usgs.gov Jane Hodgins, Forest Service   651-649-5281, jmhodgins@fs.fed.us   The bat-killing fungus recently detected for the first time in western North America is genetically similar to strains found in the eastern United States and did not likely originate in Eurasia, according to a study published today in the journal mSphere.   The findings have implications for resource managers...

Deadly bat fungus in Washington State likely originated in Eastern U.S.

News Release - August 3, 2016  Contact: Marisa Lubeck, USGS: 303-526-6694 mlubeck@usgs.gov Gail Moede Rogall, USGS: 608-270-2438, gmrogall@usgs.gov Jane Hodgins, Forest Service   651-649-5281, jmhodgins@fs.fed.us   The bat-killing fungus recently detected for the first time in western North America is genetically similar to strains found in the eastern United States and did not likely originate in Eurasia, according to a study published today in the journal mSphere.   The findings have implications for resource managers...