White-nose syndrome news

$1.5 million available for white-nose syndrome research; request for proposals

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is pleased to announce the availability of research funding in 2015 to investigate issues related directly to the management of white-nose syndrome (WNS). This opportunity is open to non-governmental, university, and private researchers, as well as State, Federal, and Tribal agency personnel. The deadline to submit a proposal is June 18. For information on WNS and currently funded projects, please see: http://www.whitenosesyndrome.org/ . As of April 10, 2015, WNS or evidence of the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) has been reported...

Strengthening our Conservation of North American Bats

For the first time in history, North American nations have formalized their shared interest in bat conservation. On April 16, wildlife leaders representing Canada, Mexico and the United States signed a Letter of Intent that will promote monitoring, research and environmentally sustainable policies and practices that support bats and their habitats. The signing was a highlight 2015's annual meeting of the Canada/Mexico/U.S. Trilateral Committee for Wildlife and Ecosystem Conservation and Management and comes at a time when bat populations across North America are increasingly threatened by the...

White-nose syndrome confirmed in Iowa; more than half of states now confirmed with disease

DES MOINES - White-nose syndrome has been confirmed in Iowa, making it the 26th state to confirm the disease of hibernating bats that has killed more than 5.7 million bats since 2006. Three bats collected in Des Moines County were confirmed to have white-nose syndrome (WNS). Two little brown bats and one northern long-eared bat observed near a cave entrance showed visible signs of WNS during monitoring for the disease. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin confirmed that the bats had WNS. Pseudogymnoascus destructans (P. d.), the...

White-nose syndrome confirmed in Iowa; more than half of states now confirmed with disease

DES MOINES - White-nose syndrome has been confirmed in Iowa, making it the 26th state to confirm the disease of hibernating bats that has killed more than 5.7 million bats since 2006. Three bats collected in Des Moines County were confirmed to have white-nose syndrome (WNS). Two little brown bats and one northern long-eared bat observed near a cave entrance showed visible signs of WNS during monitoring for the disease. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin confirmed that the bats had WNS. Pseudogymnoascus destructans (P. d.), the...

Bacteria Inhibit Bat-Killing Fungus, Could Combat White-Nose Syndrome

UC Santa Cruz researchers are testing the bacteria as a potential treatment to control white-nose syndrome, which is devastating bat populations in North America

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Protects Northern Long-eared Bat as Threatened Under Endangered Species Act

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Protects Northern Long-eared Bat as Threatened Under Endangered Species Act Also Issues Interim Special Rule that Tailors Protections to Eliminate Unnecessary Restrictions and Provide Regulatory Flexibility for Landowners The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today it is protecting the northern long-eared bat as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), primarily due to the threat posed by white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease that has devastated many bat populations. At the same time, the Service issued an interim special...