White-nose syndrome news

First bats to die from white-nose syndrome this winter reported in Keweenaw County, Michigan

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Jan. 23, 2015 Contact: Dan O’Brien, 517-336-5035 or Ed Golder, 517-284-581 Today, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced that it has received the first reports this winter of bats dying from white-nose syndrome. Members of the public found dead bats outside the opening of an abandoned copper mine near Mohawk in Keweenaw County and reported it to DNR field staff. White-nose syndrome was first discovered in Michigan in late winter 2014 in Alpena, Dickinson, Keweenaw, Mackinac and Ontonagon counties. Widespread die-offs of hibernating bats are...

Early surveillance in Wisconsin reveals positive test for the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome

By Central Office January 20, 2015 MADISON - Early winter surveillance of 15 caves revealed that two bats in a single Dane County cave tested positive for genetic markers of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome. Swabs taken from two eastern pipistrelles from a single site in November 2014 tested positive for the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), which causes white-nose syndrome in hibernating bats. This find represents both a new county and a new bat species infected with Pd in Wisconsin. The site where Pd was detected was not Cave of the Mounds, a popular show cave...

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes special rule to focus protections for northern long-eared bat: rule would apply if species is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

In response to the rapid and severe decline of the northern long-eared bat – a species important for crop pest control – the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing a special rule under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) that would provide the maximum benefit to the species while limiting the regulatory burden on the public. If finalized, the rule, under section 4(d) of the ESA, would apply only in the event the Service lists the bat as “threatened.” The Service’s proposal will appear in the Federal Register Jan. 16, 2015, opening a 60-day public comment period. Click on press...

How Does White-Nose Syndrome Kill Bats? New Science Helps Explain Hibernation Disease

For the first time, scientists have developed a detailed explanation of how white-nose syndrome (WNS) is killing millions of bats in North America, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Wisconsin. The scientists created a model for how the disease progresses from initial infection to death in bats during hibernation.