White-nose syndrome news

Three bat species listed as endangered under Canada's Species at Risk Act due to white-nose syndrome

December 17, 2014 The Government of Canada has added three species of bats to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (also known as Schedule I of the Species at Risk Act). These three bats species - the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) - have been listed as Endangered, as their survival is imminently threatened by the deadly and highly contagious disease white-nose syndrome.

Study of deadly bat disease finds surprising seasonal pattern of infections: new publication

White-nose syndrome fungus can infect an entire bat colony during hibernation, but surviving bats are able to clear the infection after they become active again. SANTA CRUZ, CA--The deadly fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome has spread to bat colonies throughout eastern North America over the past seven years, causing bat populations to crash, with several species now at risk of extinction. The devastating impact of this disease is due in part to the seasonal dynamics of infection and transmission, according to a new study led by scientists at the University of California, Santa...

Study of deadly bat disease finds surprising seasonal pattern of infections: new publication

White-nose syndrome fungus can infect an entire bat colony during hibernation, but surviving bats are able to clear the infection after they become active again. SANTA CRUZ, CA--The deadly fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome has spread to bat colonies throughout eastern North America over the past seven years, causing bat populations to crash, with several species now at risk of extinction. The devastating impact of this disease is due in part to the seasonal dynamics of infection and transmission, according to a new study led by scientists at the University of California, Santa...

Study of deadly bat disease finds surprising seasonal pattern of infections: new publication

White-nose syndrome fungus can infect an entire bat colony during hibernation, but surviving bats are able to clear the infection after they become active again. SANTA CRUZ, CA--The deadly fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome has spread to bat colonies throughout eastern North America over the past seven years, causing bat populations to crash, with several species now at risk of extinction. The devastating impact of this disease is due in part to the seasonal dynamics of infection and transmission, according to a new study led by scientists at the University of California, Santa...