White-nose syndrome news

Precursor to Bat Disease Continues to Spread in Oklahoma

Surveillance for white-nose syndrome and the fungus that causes the bat disease found that bats in seven Oklahoma counties – Adair, Cherokee, Delaware, LeFlore, Ottawa, Sequoyah, and Woodward counties – have been infected to date. The fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, was first detected in New York in the winter of 2006–2007 and had spread to Oklahoma by the winter of 2014–2015. Bats play an important ecological role; each bat can eat up to 3,000 insects, including mosquitoes and agricultural pests, in a single night. Biologists are concerned how white-nose syndrome will affect Oklahoma...
 

2018 White-nose Syndrome Research Grants from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Open

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is now accepting proposals for research to support the national response to white-nose syndrome. This funding opportunity is available on grants.gov, F18AS00119 . Proposals will be accepted until September 30, 2018, or until funds are depleted. Proposals will be reviewed on a rolling basis throughout this period. See the funding opportunity announcement for a timeline of submission and anticipated notification times. Competitive proposals will address the following priorities: 1) Understand mechanisms and patterns of survival and persistence between and...
 

White-nose Syndrome Grants to States Open; Deadline May 9

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is pleased to announce the availability of financial assistance to state and District of Columbia wildlife agencies for issues related directly to the management of white-nose syndrome. State wildlife management agencies are encouraged to apply for this opportunity. The most competitive proposals will include activities relevant to the status of white-nose syndrome and/or Pseudogymnoascus destructans in the state. A total of $1 million is available. The 2018 WNS Grants to States funding opportunity is posted at grants.gov, Funding Opportunity Number...
 

Fungus Causing White-Nose Syndrome Spreads into Central Texas

First Ever Detection in Popular Mexican Free-Tailed Bat   AUSTIN — The fungus that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats, detected for the first time in Texas in early 2017 in the Panhandle, has now spread into Central Texas. Though no bat deaths have been attributed to WNS in Texas, the syndrome has killed millions of bats in the eastern parts of the United States, raising national concern. A coalition of groups in Texas is continuing work to monitor the spread of the disease. The fungus was detected at several sites in four new counties this year including: 2 sites in Blanco...
 

Bats With White-nose Syndrome Detected In Kansas

Contact: Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism Ecological Services Section: 620- 672-5911 PRATT – White-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease that affects hibernating bats, has recently been confirmed in Kansas – the 32nd state to confirm the presence of the disease. Several dead bats, collected during cave surveys in Cherokee County in southeast Kansas and Barber County in southcentral Kansas, tested positive for the disease. Surveys were conducted between February 14 and March 1, and samples were tested by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center in...
 

Deadly bat fungus in three new South Carolina counties

The fungus that causes the devastating bat disease white-nose syndrome (WNS) is now present in three new counties in South Carolina: Cherokee, Spartanburg and York. Read the news release here.
 

Bats for the Future Fund 2018 Request for Proposals

Applicant Webinar: Friday, March 23 at 1 PM Eastern Time Proposal Due Date: Thursday, May 3, 2018 by 11:59 PM Eastern Time   OVERVIEW The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), in partnership with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), is soliciting proposals to test or deploy white-nose syndrome (WNS) treatments and management tools that lead to solutions to combat WNS and the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), as the causal agent. The program seeks to promote the survival of bats in North America. The Bats for the Future...
 

Register Now for CavesLIVE: A Distance Learning Adventure

CavesLIVE: A Distance Learning Adventure explores the world of wonder that awaits just below the surface.  REGISTER NOW at https://caveslive.org/register to learn about specially adapted animals, beautiful mirror pools, sparkling crystals, domed caverns, and twisting tunnels lie just below our feet in many areas around the world and even on other planets! Caves provide just one connection between our everyday lives and this rich underground ecosystem. Join scientists and CavesLIVE for an exploration of the world beneath our feet, and find out how we are connected to these amazing...
 

2018 WNS Small Grants Program is now accepting proposals

The WNS Small Grants program is now accepting proposals. This program funds projects for up to $30,000 to support priority communication and research needs for WNS. Applications for this program are due December 6, 2017 and must address identified priorities in: Outreach, education programs, and tools for WNS communications products Tools and strategies to improve survival rates for bats susceptible to WNS Gaps in knowledge of bat life history and ecological interactions relevant to WNS See important details in the RFP here or attached. The WNS Small Grants Program is...
 

Echo-locate your favorite bat story

It’s #BatWeek and we can’t stop talking about bats! What is more fascinating than the small flying mammals that help farmers manage pesky bugs? Go batty over stories of the nighttime critters and the work being done to save numerous bat species. From research studies to citizen science, a new story map hosted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service highlights bat conservation efforts across North America.