Information for Cavers

The caving community has a strong conservation ethic and has provided long-time support of bat conservation. We request that cavers observe all cave closures and advisories and refrain from caving in WNS-affected states and adjoining states at any time. We also recommend refraining from caving anywhere during bat hibernation to minimize disturbance to bats.

 

White-nose syndrome found in tour routes of Mammoth Cave

Date: February 24, 2014

Contact: Vickie Carson, 270-758-2192

(MAMMOTH CAVE, Ky., February 24, 2014) White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), a disease that is deadly to bats, has been found to be present along the toured passageways of Mammoth Cave. Park staff discovered WNS in remote sections of Mammoth Cave last year, including colonial hibernacula.

Caves Remain Closed to Protect Bats in Ozark-St. Francis National Forests (Jan. 30, 2014)

RUSSELLVILLE, Ark. —In the wake of the Arkansas Game & Fish Commission’s announcement of White-nose Syndrome in Arkansas, Ozark-St. Francis National Forests officials are reminding visitors that caves on the national forests remain closed, with the exception of Blanchard Springs Cavern in Stone County.

In May 2009, the regional forester for the Southern Region issued a closure order for all caves and mines on National Forest system lands unless there are official Forest Service signs listing them as open.

White-nose syndrome confirmed in Arkansas

Arkansas becomes 23rd state to confirm deadly disease in bats

YELLVILLE – The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission has confirmed the presence of white-nose syndrome, a disease fatal to several bat species, in Arkansas. The disease was documented in two northern long-eared bats found at a cave on natural area managed by the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission in Marion County.

UA researchers trace bat killer’s path

As North American bats face a death toll approaching 7 million, University of Akron scientists reveal new clues about their killer, White Nose Syndrome, or WNS. The UA researchers reveal that the deadly WNS fungus can likely survive in caves with or without the presence of bats and threatens the regional extinction of North American bats.

Updated Battle for Bats Video available!

Battle For Bats: Surviving White Nose Syndrome is an updated, 2013 version of the original, 2011 Battle for Bats video. This 14-minute film shows what government agencies are doing about white-nose syndrome and how you can help. Produced in partnership by the USDA Forest Service and National White-nose Syndrome Communications Working Group, the video may be embedded on your website.

Battle for Bats: Surviving White Nose Syndrome (video)

Battle For Bats: Surviving White Nose Syndrome, is an updated (2013) version of the original Battle for Bats video. This 14-minute film shows what government agencies are doing about white-nose syndrome and how you can help. It was produced in partnership by the USDA Forest Service and National White-nose Syndrome Communications Working Group. Feel free to embed this video on your website.

White-nose syndrome infographic

One-page 11x17" poster with white-nose syndrome facts
AttachmentSize
11 by 17 version773.98 KB
Web version578.33 KB

What is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommending in its cave advisory?

What is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommending in its cave advisory?

The Service’s cave advisory has four recommendations to limit the possible spread of white-nose syndrome by human activity:

  1. A voluntary moratorium on caving in states with confirmed WNS and all adjoining states; Nationally, in states not WNS-affected or adjoining states, use clothing and gear that has never been in caves in WNS-affected or adjoining states; State and federal conservation agencies should evaluate scientific activities for their potential to spread WNS; and Nationally, researchers should use clothing and gear that has never been in caves in a WNS-affected or adjoining state.
  2. This also applies to mines used by cavers.