State and local partners

Arizona Game and Fish logo Arizona Game and Fish Department
The Arizona Game and Fish Department is working with other states and federal agencies across the U.S. to develop management strategies to prevent or slow the movement of WNS to Arizona.
Arkansas Game and Fish Commission logo Arkansas Game and Fish Commission
The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission participates in and supports monitoring of bat populations, including white nose syndrome surveillence, across the state. As a land manager we also work to protect bat populations using caves on AGFC Wildlife Management Areas.
Arkansas National Heritage Commission Arkansas Natural Heritage Commisson
The Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission owns and manages caves within the state many with listed karst species. The Commission also works closely with federal and other state organizations in response to the threat of WNS within the state.
California Department of Fish and Game
The California Department of Fish and Game’s mission is to manage California's diverse fish, wildlife, and plant resources, and the habitats upon which they depend, for their ecological values and for their use and enjoyment by the public. WNS potentially poses a serious threat to the bats of California if it arrives here, and it could undermine ecosystems throughout the state.
Colorado Parks and Wildlife
Colorado Parks &Wildlife is committed to working with partners on devising practical disease detection and control strategies, managing potential human impacts to bats at caves and inactive mines, and working towards collaborative solutions to provide for cave recreation while minimizing risks of WNS transmission.
Delaware Division of Fish & Wildlife Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, Division of Fish and Wildlife
"Multi-Agency Collaboration: Delaware is part of a nation-wide agency team of state and national biologists tracking White-nose Syndrome. This team plans research and projects designed to find answers about the disease.
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
FWC monitors hibernating and maternity colonies of cave roosting bat species to assess baseline health and population trends. We provide science-based technical assistance to other state agencies and interested partners on the potential impacts of WNS and the management of bat populations.
Georgia Department of Natural Resources
Biologists with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GA DNR) developed a WNS plan and are actively participating in education and monitoring/surveillance for WNS in the state. Georgia has several hibernacula, which are surveyed every year to search for signs of WNS. GA DNR also works with the caving community in the state to detect early signs of WNS.
Idaho Department of Fish and Game Idaho Department of Fish and Game
The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is actively engaged in WNS activities in the state, region, and nation. Our staff participate in biweekly state-federal WNS conference calls, attend national meetings, and serve on WNS-related committees.
Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Fish and Wildlife Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Fish and Wildlife
The Indiana Department of Natural Resources has statutory authority over all bat species native to Indiana. The agency's involvement with WNS includes components for disease surveillance (active, passive, on-line public reporting), population monitoring (winter hibernacula and summer reproductive season), land management policies, and public education.
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is currently collecting baseline information on bat roosting sites and developing a response plan should White-nose Syndrome turn up in the state.
Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Suspected white nose syndrome (WNS) was found on bats during a DNR survey of a bat hibernation site in an Allegany County cave near Cumberland on March 5, 2010. Several dead bats and over two hundred visibly affected bats were found during the survey.
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Minnesota Department of Natural Resources
The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR) works with citizens and partners to conserve and manage the state’s natural areas, native plants and animals; to protect ecological health by addressing threats such as invasive species; and to promote enjoyment and understanding of nature through recreational and educational opportunities
New Hampshire Fish and Game Department New Hampshire Fish and Game Department
NHFG is the lead agency for monitoring and responding to WNS in New Hampshire. NHFG biologists have been involved in the overall WNS surveillance, monitoring and response effort from the beginning of the multi-state effort in February 2008. WNS was first documented in NH in 2010.
New Mexico Abandoned Mine Land Program New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Dept. - Abandoned Mine Land Program
The Abandoned Mine Land Program (AMLP) of New Mexico evaluates abandoned mines for bat habitat and protects those found to be significant habitat with bat friendly structures that allow ingress and egress while excluding human disturbance except for research.
North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is conducting surveillance for the presence and prevalence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) throughout North Carolina and monitoring bat populations year-round to determine the effects of White Nose Syndrome on our bats. This includes monitoring caves for hibernating bats, mist-netting, and acoustic monitoring during the maternity period.
Pennsylvania Game Commission Pennsylvania Game Commission
Our organization has been instrumental from the start in determining and mapping locations of WNS occurrences, initiating summer maternity colony monitoring, developing innovative research collaborations that investigate (just a few for examples): the potential for treatment, investigate the physiological and immune responses of bats afflicted by the disease, developing new non-lethal techniques t
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources South Carolina Department of Natural Resources
Our mission is to serve as the principal advocate for and steward of South Carolina’s natural resources. Bats are an important natural resource of significant biological and economic importance. The SCDNR is committed to the detection of WNS and timely sharing of information with partner agencies and organizations and the public. We endeavor to reduce the spread of WNS.
Texas Parks & Wildlife Logo Texas Parks & Wildlife Department
We are the state agency responsible for the conservation of wildlife, including bats, and we also manage recreational resources such as state parks. We are monitoring bat populations for the signs of WNS, developing a WNS response plan in collaboration with partners, and working with other organizations to educate the public about this threat.
Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department
The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department is actively engaged in the fight against White-nose Syndrome. The Department participates in disease surveillance, research, and monitoring of bat populations affected by WNS. Staff within the Department also serve on regional and national committees for coordinating work priorities, including through the National Plan for White-nose Syndrome.
Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries
"In response to the discovery and spread of WNS, VDGIF and partners initiated three projects to assist in our understanding of WNS and its impacts.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is very concerned about White-nose Syndrome (WNS) impacts upon bat populations and potential ecosystem effects. We are committed to educating the public about bats and WNS, and we are taking actions intended to deal with the management of this disease once it may occur in Washington.
West Virginia Division of Natural Resources West Virginia Division of Natural Resources
The WVDNR monitors bat populations by conducting surveys of hibernacula, Virginia big-eared bats maternity colony counts, and acoustic routes statewide. These surveys help document the spread of WNS and its impact on bat populations in West Virginia.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
"The Department of Natural Resources is the lead agency for WNS response in Wisconsin. The WDNR collaborates with state, tribal, federal and local agencies to control the impacts of WNS in the state. The role of WDNR includes: 1. Manage Wisconsin WNS Surveillance and Response 2. Organize and lead the State’s WNS science and stakeholder advisory groups
Wyoming Game and Fish Department Wyoming Game and Fish Department
The Wyoming Game and Fish Department serves as the lead agency for WNS issues in Wyoming. In cooperation with the Wyoming Bat Working Group we've developed a strategic plan for WNS to address conservation and management issues in Wyoming.