White-nose syndrome news

Fungus associated with White-nose Syndrome detected in Delaware bats

Delaware environmental officials have confirmed the fungus associated with White-nose Syndrome (WNS) on bats in two locations in New Castle County. The disease is characterized by a white fungus on the noses, wings, tails and ears of bats.

Fungus associated with White-nose Syndrome detected in Delaware bats

No threat posed to humans, pets, livestock or property; Division of Fish and Wildlife continues to monitor Delaware bats for impacts from WNS Delaware environmental officials have confirmed the fungus associated with White-nose Syndrome (WNS) on bats in two locations in New Castle County. The disease is characterized by a white fungus on the noses, wings, tails and ears of bats. The fungus thrives in cold temperatures and is seen on bats in caves and mines in the northeast, Canada and, more recently, in Tennessee and Missouri.

IDNR Closing State Owned and Managed Caves

Move intended to help slow spread of white-nose syndrome killing bats in northeastern states and recently confirmed in the Midwest SPRINGFIELD, IL – The Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) is closing state-owned and managed caves that support bat populations as part of a national effort to slow the spread of the mysterious white-nose syndrome affecting bats in the northeastern United States.

Bat Tests Positive For White Nose Syndrome Fungus

Biologists at Great Smoky Mountains National Park have received confirmation that an Indiana bat collected from its hibernating refuge in the park’s White Oak Blowhole cave has tested positive for Geomyces destructans, the fungus and the presumptive causative agent of White Nose Syndrome (WNS).

White Nose Syndrome Continues to Decimate Bat Populations Outlook for Connecticut’s Bats is Bleak

A syndrome that attacks hibernating bats continues to kill them at alarming rates both in Connecticut and in expanding areas range-wide, which will lead to a dramatic reduction in the size of the state’s bat population this summer, according to wildlife experts at the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).

Great Smoky Mountains National Park Bat Tests Positive for White Nose Syndrome Fungus

Biologists at Great Smoky Mountains National Park have received confirmation that one Little Brown bat collected from its hibernating refuge in the Park’s White Oak Blowhole cave tested positive for Geomyces destructans [the fungus and the presumptive causative agent of White Nose Syndrome (WNS)]. White Oak Blowhole cave contains the largest known Indiana bat hibernacula in Tennessee. The Indiana bat is a federally listed endangered species which has seen declines in the Northeastern U.S. due to WNS. White Nose Syndrome has killed in excess of 90% of the bats in many of the caves and mines...

White Nose Syndrome in Bat Populations- The Presence of the Syndrome is Confirmed in Quebec

The Quebec Ministry of Natural Resources has confirmed the presence of white nose syndrome in certain bat populations in the province of Quebec.

Winter Surveys Show White Nose Syndrome Significantly Affecting N.H. Bats

Winter surveys in New Hampshire show that white nose syndrome is having a dramatic effect on bat populations.